28 thoughts on “Requests Welcome!

        1. The Wild Pomegranate (Abi)

          Most of my orthodox family was either deceased or very elderly but the time I reached that age in adulthood where I carved out my own path. There’s not a whole lot to say. It’s a pretty typical story where the ‘kids’ find their own paths to Judaism in adulthood. I don’t feel I did anything unusual. The baby boomer generations on forward were primarily attracted to the liberal denominations of Judaism. I think this a typical story in Judaism and other faiths.

          I enjoy the Jewish smorgasbord and really enjoyed teaching adult Jewish learning. Starting my own chavurahs (chavurot) was rewarding.

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            1. The Wild Pomegranate (Abi)

              💗🦋💗🦋💗

              Keep seeking out your place! Many Jewish adults struggle to find their place in Judaism, as in the right denomination, practice and congregation for them. Many do not find the Judaism they grew up with to be fulfilling. I found the more progressive denominations to be more attuned to issues important to me.

              Many Christian friends told me they did not resonate with the Christianity they grew up with and underwent the same journey trying to find the right practice, denomination and church for them. I think it’s a religiously universal thing.

              It’s not an easy journey for people of any faith. Everyone gets there in their own time. Sometimes it takes a lot of house of worship hopping before you find your place. Connecting to your clergy person is very important too. Often a chavurah can be a better option, if there are any in your area.

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              1. I have a different problem: I’m mostly OK with Orthodox Jewish thought and practice, but I struggle to get on with a lot of Orthodox Jews. Sometimes I find people narrow-minded, lacking in empathy and rather bourgeois in tastes and morals. I feel bad for saying that, as there are good people in the Orthodox community, but it’s not always easy to be a part of it. I’m lucky to have an understanding rabbi to talk to (not my shul rabbi, which probably also helps as he has distance).

                Also, for me it’s a second journey, as I was raised traditional but not frum and made the transition from that to full Orthodox observance and now am looking for my place socially rather than religiously.

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                1. The Wild Pomegranate (Abi)

                  Chasidic Judaism was a mixed bag for me — I resonated with some aspects and struggled with others. Personally, I found myself feeling deprived by the lack of the egalitarianism and longing for a more pluralistic embrace of Jewish spirituality. I spent many adult years searching. I can’t say I’ve found the ideal congregation or rabbi for me, but I think that can be an elusive goal for people of all faiths. Being Jewish, sometimes we’re restricted by proximity and lack of options that are accessible to us. It can be a geographical problem. Some cities have many Jewish options spread throughout, some have few. The journey continues…

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                  1. I can see that. I also have mixed feelings about Chasidism.

                    I agree about the geographical problem. I feel that a lot in the UK; with only 400,000 Jews, we’re really a backwater and there simply isn’t the choice that I would have in the USA or Israel.

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                    1. The Wild Pomegranate (Abi)

                      Certain cities in the USA have very few synagogues or the nearest one is a commute of an hour to two hours each way. Just commented on that. It’s a real issue.

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                2. The Wild Pomegranate (Abi)

                  One advantage of Christianity is that there are abundant churches everywhere, often one on every corner and block. Being a minority, Jews don’t always have many options available to us, depending on where we live. There can be very few synagogues in certain cities and towns — sometimes none. Sometimes it’s a long commute just to get to the nearest one and that can be a burnout, making it really difficult (or impossible) to find our place. Not everyone can manage the commute due to health issues or other challenges. It can be very isolating. I’ve had Jewish friends that were an hour to two hours (or more) drive each way from the closest synagogue. It’s a real problem.

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              2. Profound and true answer on “finding our way” in our faith journey no matter where it began. Today my family practiced our “Christian” Sabbath by reading a few of the Buddhist teachings of Thick Nhat Hanh with some side-notes by me on where we might include ideas from our faith beliefs such as G-d, Prayer, the Holy Spirit of G-d, and Jesus as perhaps the most “mindful” person who ever lived. Not for your faint of heart traditional Christian.LOL! Joy in the journey to all seekers, Jane

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                1. The Wild Pomegranate (Abi)

                  You’re speaking my language, Jane!! I’m into spiritual inclusivity too, but it’s not everyone’s cup of tea. One time I did a Shabbat question exercise and one of the questions was “If you could invite any living person to Shabbat dinner who would it be?” I said Thich Nhat Hanh and The Rock. 🤣 (I just happen to love The Rock). Joy to the journey!!

                  Liked by 1 person

  1. I have long been fascinated with the belief in spiritual, symbolic and prophetic numerology of Jewish beliefs, at least as found in the ancient Hebrew Scriptures and peoples.This is merely one area in which I fear so many who claim Christianity direly misunderstand the numbers and their various meanings throughout Scripture, even beginning with naming them the “10” (number of completeness) commandments all the way to the numbers people are throwing around like crazy especially again these days, found in the Christian Bible as found in books like The Revelation (the misunderstanding of the number 666 for example.) This is a “biggie” but if you would enjoy it, I think it would be fun, enlightening, and worthy of your scholarship. Shalom — Jane

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  2. Christians talk about God’s will and our will (human will) and how they intertwine. Preference is given nearly always to God’s will. Though our decisions matter, too. Is there a Jewish perspective on will?

    This is what came first to mind. Feel free to go with it or not. I’d be glad to say more, too, for the sake of clarity (if I can be clear).

    I hope you’re well and enjoying some things in the new week!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The Wild Pomegranate (Abi)

      It’s the same in Judaism— we have free will, but we’re supposed to study, learn and abide by GD’s will. Mitzvot are the core of Judaism and mitzvot are GD’s will. That’s why it’s our job on earth (if one is a believer) to perform them. Mitzvot don’t always jibe with our human inclinations, but they are supposed to help us to repair what is broken in the world and grow as human beings.

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  3. Has Judaism evolved over the ages as a religion? Is it interpreted the same today as 500 years ago? Are younger generations more discerning and demanding in their answers to theological questions?

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  4. Shaina

    I feel as if you are not only a brilliant writer and commentator but you are eclectic. Usually, Orthodox are dogmatic about their sector and have no experience in any other denomination of the religion. You have experience in almost all of the denominations. You are very well rounded. You can identify the, “trade offs”, or what some people call the pros and cons of each denomination. You writing is flowery, creative, and enjoyable. Sure it is informative but I also want to have some fun. I learn from you in an innocuous way. I have fun while I learn.

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    1. The Wild Pomegranate (Abi)

      Very well put! I do see the pros, cons and trade-offs of each denomination and incorporate the best of all Jewish worlds into my writing, teaching and outlook on Judaism. Fun is the key. It’s a great mitzvah to be freilach (Yiddish/joyful) in the practice of Judaism. I feel every religion is meant to be joyful, but people get hung up on dogmatism, holier-than-thou pettiness, greed, hierarchies and the business 🤑of religion. I’ve seen it in churches and synagogues, much to my dismay. Thank you for your support and inspiration! It is very much appreciated. 🌻

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